Archive for Better Tomorrows

HILLARY CLINTON PROCLAMATION By Sheriff Gerry Ali

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on August 1, 2016 by sheriffali

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Beyond this campaign to November eight

American Patriots will exit their gate,

And down the roads to the voting booth

They will give Democracy a humongous boost

 

Fear and hate will never win

Those believer’s numbers are few and thin,

The disease of racism and hate

Only misery and darkness is their fate

 

You are my epitome is this beautiful world

Thoughts of you serenades my soul,

Betwixt we are in serendipity

Together we are the strings of democracy

 

So, in the midst of this 2016 important election

For a better world vote Hillary Clinton,

On November 8 deny fear and vote for hope

Don’t stay at home, but go out and vote!

 

By Sheriff Gerry Ali ©2016

 

Twitter @sheriffali

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At the State of the Union, a President Outgunned in Congress Is Still Combative [NYT]

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on January 21, 2015 by sheriffali

The circumstances facing President Obama as he delivered his State of the Union address Tuesday night could not have seemed less promising: a presidency with only two years left to get anything done in a Congress that is now totally in the control of a party that has routinely ignored his pleas for cooperation. So he chose wisely to send a simple, dramatic message about economic fairness, about the fact that the well-off — the top earners, the big banks, Silicon Valley — have done just great, while the middle and working classes remain dead in the water. His remedy: skim from the rich and redistribute to those below, while deploying other weapons to raise wages and increase jobs.

 

He did not frame the debate over inequality as starkly as many economists have, preferring instead to talk about the virtues of “middle-class economics.” But he came close. “It’s now up to us to choose who we want to be over the next 15 years, and for decades to come,” he said. “Will we accept an economy where only a few of us do spectacularly well? Or will we commit ourselves to an economy that generates rising incomes and chances for everyone who makes the effort?”

Mr. Obama knows his prospects of getting Congress to agree are less than zero; Republicans dismissed his ideas before he even voiced them. That does not make them irrelevant. Mr. Obama was speaking not just to the present but to the future, to the 2016 presidential elections and even beyond. By simply raising the plight of the middle class (and, looming behind it, the larger issue of economic inequality), he has firmly inserted issues of economic fairness into the political debate. Hillary Rodham Clinton or whomever the Democrats nominate cannot ignore them now. Even Republicans, disinclined to raise taxes on top-tier earners, may find attractive the idea of doing something for those in the middle.

 

Twitter @sheriffali

 

http://nyti.ms/15w0BRi

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Artist Kara Walker Draws Us Into Bitter History With Something Sweet…

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on May 17, 2014 by sheriffali

 

[Source NPR]

 

Kara Walker was barely out of art school when she won a MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant, in 1997. Back then, her early work shocked audiences in part because her murals looked so charming from a distance. Black paper shadow portraits of colonial figures seemed to dance on white gallery walls; but lean in and you’d find your nose pressed up against images of slavery’s horrors — mammies, masters, lynchings and sexual violence.

 

In other words, Walker is used to filling a room. But this spring she was asked to fill a warehouse — the abandoned Domino Sugar factory in New York. It’s about to be leveled to make way for condos and offices, but before it goes, Walker was asked to use this cavernous, urban ruin for something special.

 

Walker took me on a tour of the show a day before it opened. The factory is covered in sugar — it almost looks like insulation or burned cotton candy.

 

“It’s a little bit sticky in some areas …” she said. “There’s sugar caked up in the rafters.”

 

I was so busy trying not to get molasses on my shoes that when I turned the corner, I was stunned. There in the middle of this dark hall was a bright, white sphinx. The effect is the opposite of those white-walled galleries; a dark space and a towering white sculpture made of — what else? — sugar.

 

“What we’re seeing, for lack of a better term, is the head of a woman who has very African, black features,” Walker explained. “She sits somewhere in between the kind of mammy figure of old and something a little bit more recognizable — recognizably human. … [She has] very full lips; high cheekbones; eyes that have no eyes, [that] seem to be either looking out or closed; and a kerchief on her head. She’s positioned with her arms flat out across the ground and large breasts that are staring at you.”

 

Walker has dreamed up a “subtlety” — that’s what sugar sculptures were called in medieval times. They were a luxury confectioners created for special occasions.

 

http://www.npr.org/2014/05/16/313017716/artist-kara-walker-draws-us-into-bitter-history-with-something-sweet

 

Twitter @sheriffali

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