Archive for CIA Torture

Why Does Dick Cheney Keep Talking? Bush And Cheney Guilty of War Crimes And Genocide – Iraq War!

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on March 18, 2015 by sheriffali

As I read the incredibly long interview with Dick Cheney published by Playboy Magazine yesterday, filled with his usual rewriting of history and sneering attacks on President Obama, the big question that came to mind was: Why do an interview with Mr. Cheney at this point at all? And, relatedly: Why does Mr. Cheney feel this endless need to maintain a public profile?

 

Could it be that he’s hoping he could run a vice-presidential search committee for another member of the Bush family (Jeb) and pick himself again? It beggars belief and would drive every interest group outside of the extreme right crazy, but I learned a long time ago to never underestimate Mr. Cheney.

 

A few tidbits popped out of the interview, including Mr. Cheney’s bland dismissal of the idea that there could be a hint of racism in the endless partisan assaults on Mr. Obama, and on Attorney General Eric Holder, Jr. Accusing Mr. Obama and Mr. Holder, rather hilariously, of “playing the race card,” Mr. Cheney said criticism of the two men “hasn’t got anything to do with race.”

 

Obviously, race is a factor. Not in every critique on every subject, but it is there, not so deep below the surface.

 

Mr. Cheney also rather cynically brushed off the racism inherent in relations between largely white police forces like the one in Ferguson, Mo., and the largely black communities that they serve.

 

He spoke as though the only issue in the shooting last August of Michael Brown by Officer Darren Wilson was whether Mr. Wilson had acted legally. A grand jury and the Justice Department concluded that he had, and for Mr. Cheney, that ended the discussion. He said not a word about the underlying issues, or in fact about the other Justice Department report that found a disturbing pattern of racism in the Ferguson police department’s behavior over the years.

 

Asked if the country would see “more Fergusons,” Mr. Cheney said: “I don’t know. I’m reluctant to generalize from it. I’ll leave it at that.”

 

At one point, Mr. Cheney recalled that Mr. Bush had come to him to say, hesitantly it seems, that he was going to support a constitutional ban on same-sex marriage. Mr. Cheney was on record supporting same-sex marriage, but apparently that was entirely because his daughter, Mary, is gay.

 

“I can remember having lunch with him at one point, and he was trying to explain to me what he was going to do,” Mr. Cheney said. “And of course he knew about Mary, and that’s partly what stimulated his concern. He was worried that somehow I would be offended by what he was doing.”

 

Are we supposed to conclude that Mr. Cheney was not offended? How strange. [New York Times]

 

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Open New York Times Link For Full Article

http://nyti.ms/1AGgLjt

 

DICK CHENEY GEORGE W BUSH IMPRISONED

President Ronald Reagan May 20, 1988: By giving its advice and consent to ratification of this Convention, the Senate of the United States will demonstrate unequivocally our desire to bring an end to the abhorrent practice of torture.

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , , , on December 11, 2014 by sheriffali

To the Senate of the United States:

 

With a view to receiving the advice and consent of the Senate to ratification, subject to certain reservations, understandings, and declarations, I transmit herewith the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment. The Convention was adopted by unanimous agreement of the United Nations General Assembly on December 10, 1984, and entered into force on June 26, 1987. The United States signed it on April 18, 1988. I also transmit, for the information of the Senate, the report of the Department of State on the Convention.

 

The United States participated actively and effectively in the negotiation of the Convention. It marks a significant step in the development during this century of international measures against torture and other inhuman treatment or punishment. Ratification of the Convention by the United States will clearly express United States opposition to torture, an abhorrent practice unfortunately still prevalent in the world today.

 

The core provisions of the Convention establish a regime for international cooperation in the criminal prosecution of torturers relying on so-called “universal jurisdiction.” Each State Party is required either to prosecute torturers who are found in its territory or to extradite them to other countries for prosecution.

 

In view of the large number of States concerned, it was not possible to negotiate a treaty that was acceptable to the United States in all respects. Accordingly, certain reservations, understandings, and declarations have been drafted, which are discussed in the report of the Department of State. With the inclusion of these reservations, understandings, and declarations, I believe there are no constitutional or other legal obstacles to United States ratification. The recommended legislation necessary to implement the Convention will be submitted to the Congress separately.

 

 Should the Senate give its advice and consent to ratification of the Convention, I intend at the time of deposit of United States ratification to make a declaration pursuant to Article 28 that the United States does not recognize the competence of the Committee against Torture under Article 20 to make confidential investigations of charges that torture is being systematically practiced in the United States. In addition, I intend not to make declarations, pursuant to Articles 21 and 22 of the Convention, recognizing the competence of the Committee against Torture to receive and consider communications from States and individuals alleging that the United States is violating the Convention. I believe that a final United States decision as to whether to accept such competence of the Committee should be withheld until we have had an opportunity to assess the Committee’s work. It would be possible for the United States in the future to accept the competence of the Committee pursuant to Articles 20, 21, and 22, should experience with the Committee prove satisfactory and should the United States consider this step desirable.

 

By giving its advice and consent to ratification of this Convention, the Senate of the United States will demonstrate unequivocally our desire to bring an end to the abhorrent practice of torture.

 

RONALD REAGAN
The White House,
May 20, 1988.

 

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 RONALD REAGAN SIGNED THE UN CONVENTION AGAINST TORTURE